Ask The Doctor

What are the common causes of nasal fungus?

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My son was recently diagnosed with nasal fungus after suffering from nasal congestion. I have to admit that before his diagnosis I was unaware such a thing existed. What are the common causes of nasal fungus?

1 Answer

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Thanks for the great question!

I’m glad to hear that your son was properly diagnosed.

I have seen a significant increase in the number of patients in my office with this condition which is commonly called fungal sinusitis. I attribute this increase to an over use of antibiotics to treat sinus infections. You see, not all sinus infections respond to antibiotics.

If you’ve had chronic sinus infections, especially with symptoms that don’t get better with typical treatments, you could have a fungal sinus infection.

Since our practice has significant experience with fungal sinusitis we always do a detailed medical history and if necessary have a mucus sample sent to a laboratory where it is examined for signs of fungi .

Common causes of nasal fungus are: weakened immune system or chronic untreated or improperly treated sinusitis.

While fungal sinus infections can occur in healthy individuals, they are most common in people with weakened immune systems. When your immune system is vulnerable, fungi can grow, especially in damp and dark environments—aka your sinuses.

Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a common type of fungal infection in the sinuses. The infecting fungi are found in the environment and cause an allergic reaction which results in thick fungal debris, sticky mucus and blockage of the infected sinus. Patients with AFS may have allergies, nasal polyps and may have asthma. As a result of the condition, most patients develop chronic sinusitis which may affect their sense of smell. Left untreated, this condition may lead to displacement of the eyeball and vision loss.

Although AFS can occur at any age, allergic fungal sinusitis is more common in adolescents and young adults.

Other types of fungal sinusitis are: Mycetoma Fungal Sinusitis, Chronic Indolent Sinusitis and Fulminant Sinusitis.

Hope this helps!

Your Answer

1 Answer

0

Thanks for the great question!

I’m glad to hear that your son was properly diagnosed.

I have seen a significant increase in the number of patients in my office with this condition which is commonly called fungal sinusitis. I attribute this increase to an over use of antibiotics to treat sinus infections. You see, not all sinus infections respond to antibiotics.

If you’ve had chronic sinus infections, especially with symptoms that don’t get better with typical treatments, you could have a fungal sinus infection.

Since our practice has significant experience with fungal sinusitis we always do a detailed medical history and if necessary have a mucus sample sent to a laboratory where it is examined for signs of fungi .

Common causes of nasal fungus are: weakened immune system or chronic untreated or improperly treated sinusitis.

While fungal sinus infections can occur in healthy individuals, they are most common in people with weakened immune systems. When your immune system is vulnerable, fungi can grow, especially in damp and dark environments—aka your sinuses.

Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a common type of fungal infection in the sinuses. The infecting fungi are found in the environment and cause an allergic reaction which results in thick fungal debris, sticky mucus and blockage of the infected sinus. Patients with AFS may have allergies, nasal polyps and may have asthma. As a result of the condition, most patients develop chronic sinusitis which may affect their sense of smell. Left untreated, this condition may lead to displacement of the eyeball and vision loss.

Although AFS can occur at any age, allergic fungal sinusitis is more common in adolescents and young adults.

Other types of fungal sinusitis are: Mycetoma Fungal Sinusitis, Chronic Indolent Sinusitis and Fulminant Sinusitis.

Hope this helps!